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Battling the Post-Erasmus Blues: Hello my name is…

While it may not be a recognised medical condition, that glum feeling you get when you return to your home university is definitely normal, and something that every Ex-Erasmus student experiences. Right? In our new series, you can follow our author’s way back into ‘normal-life’ after an eventful year abroad.

Nothing has changed yet, but everything is different – The UK after the referendum

24 June, the day when the result of Britain’s referendum on exiting the EU was announced, happened now several weeks ago. The first feelings of surprise and disbelief that the UK, Europe and the world experienced on that day have subsided and the country is now different from what it was. What has changed and what will the future bring?

Cooking with grandma (Spain): Potato Omelet

In this episode of “Cooking with Grandma” we’ll show you how to cook the famous ‘Tortilla de Patata’ (potato omelet), also known as Spanish omelet.

Cultural diversity is Europe’s biggest strength

In Europe, so many different countries and cultures are packed together that it is hard to imagine everyone getting along. And yet, we do. Sort of. Well, some teasing and quarrels happen even in the best families. But what we should never forget is that this diversity is also our biggest asset. Nine young people from different parts of Europe have told us about what they feel the people in their country could learn from others in Europe, and also how they think their country could serve as an example for the community in other ways.

Rolling through the world

Partying, going to concerts and travelling a lot. You’ll surely have done it a hundred times. But then someone reveals to you: “I thought you were not interested in these kinds of things!” Are you surprised? This is the situation which Marta Llauradó has to face every day. A girl who has functional diversity and tries to explain in her blog the prejudices society has towards her.

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  • Diversity and Equality
  • Europe
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  • Photography
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In our Wallets

Everyone has a wallet and the bigger the wallet, the more we can put inside. Wallets are supposed to be for money but other random things can be found in there. It seems as though they are for everything. Recently our wallets have become a social issue. Everyone has started to count and recount their earnings, their costs and even pension contributions. Here are some wallets showing how they are used. What do you have in yours?

“You don’t just need a Leica, you also need a head and an eye.”

In 1914 Oskar Barnack, an employee at the optics enterprise Leitz in the German town of Wetzlar and a passionate amateur filmmaker, developed the first miniature camera that did not use glass plate exposure like other cameras at the time, but roll film. After its introduction to the market in 1924 it became a worldwide success and its compact size enabled a whole new kind of photography. Since 2014 the exhibition “Eyes Wide Open! – 100 Years of Leica Photography” has been taking a look at the culture that surrounds it and presenting the best pieces of the century in various European cities.

Wheels of Art

“I dreamed of becoming an actor. Instead I create tire sculptures.” Aghvan dreamed of becoming an actor. However he didn’t have the chance to make his dream come true in his life . He left school when he was 14 when he started to work and support his family. Aghvan’s first job was at a bakery, so being a baker can be considered his first profession. When he turned 18 he was enlisted in the army for two years. After serving he didn’t want to go back to his previous job, so he took some lessons and became a car tire specialist.

“The key to being a good photographer lies in the determination”

Photographer Gianfranco Tripodo has achieved one of the most prestigious awards in photojournalism, the World Press Photo, thanks to a snapshot that shows one of the harshest realities of the European Union: the situation of immigrants in the border city of Melilla.

A Song is a Weapon

Protest songs are common in every country. Mainly throughout the 60’s and 70’s, when rock and folk became charged with political and social statements about the world, sex, work, power, relations between people, discrimination. They call for change and denounce that which is wrong. Protest songs are especially important and courageous in countries where fighting oppression can cost you your life. And that was the case in Portugal during the 40 year period of the dictatorship that ended with the Carnation Revolution in 1974.

Cultural diversity is Europe’s biggest strength

In Europe, so many different countries and cultures are packed together that it is hard to imagine everyone getting along. And yet, we do. Sort of. Well, some teasing and quarrels happen even in the best families. But what we should never forget is that this diversity is also our biggest asset. Nine young people from different parts of Europe have told us about what they feel the people in their country could learn from others in Europe, and also how they think their country could serve as an example for the community in other ways.

Rolling through the world

Partying, going to concerts and travelling a lot. You’ll surely have done it a hundred times. But then someone reveals to you: “I thought you were not interested in these kinds of things!” Are you surprised? This is the situation which Marta Llauradó has to face every day. A girl who has functional diversity and tries to explain in her blog the prejudices society has towards her.

Four visions over one reality: homosexuality in Russia

We spoke to Andrey Glushkó, who moved to Spain to live in ‘’freedom’’, his friend Anastasiya Belickaya, the young political scientist Nina Ivanova and the correspondent for El Mundo (daily Spanish newspaper) in Moscow to discover why 74 percent of Russians do not socially accept homosexuality.

The silent charm of sign language

I met with Grigoris and Sofia, two people who know sign language, the first out of physical necessity and the second out of desire, to talk about the secrets of sign language.

Battling the Post-Erasmus Blues: Hello my name is…

While it may not be a recognised medical condition, that glum feeling you get when you return to your home university is definitely normal, and something that every Ex-Erasmus student experiences. Right? In our new series, you can follow our author’s way back into ‘normal-life’ after an eventful year abroad.

Nothing has changed yet, but everything is different – The UK after the referendum

24 June, the day when the result of Britain’s referendum on exiting the EU was announced, happened now several weeks ago. The first feelings of surprise and disbelief that the UK, Europe and the world experienced on that day have subsided and the country is now different from what it was. What has changed and what will the future bring?

Cultural diversity is Europe’s biggest strength

In Europe, so many different countries and cultures are packed together that it is hard to imagine everyone getting along. And yet, we do. Sort of. Well, some teasing and quarrels happen even in the best families. But what we should never forget is that this diversity is also our biggest asset. Nine young people from different parts of Europe have told us about what they feel the people in their country could learn from others in Europe, and also how they think their country could serve as an example for the community in other ways.

An ever growing family: Establishing the European Youth Parliament in Armenia

Young, motivated and ready to change the world: this is how the members of the European Youth Parliament of Armenia are best described. Hovsep Patvakanyan, head and founder of EYP Armenia, told us about his experiences establishing this extraordinary youth organization in Armenia, and the wonderful ideas which came to life thanks to the efforts of its members.

Britain after Brexit: The dashed hopes of young Europhiles

The UK has voted to leave the EU, a close decision which has left many British people, especially the young, feeling frustrated and apprehensive. Our author attempts to describe the reaction of the 48% of the voters who wanted to remain, and how it feels now to be in a post-Brexit Britain.

Cooking with grandma (Spain): Potato Omelet

In this episode of “Cooking with Grandma” we’ll show you how to cook the famous ‘Tortilla de Patata’ (potato omelet), also known as Spanish omelet.

Meeting in a Café: Our Favourites Around Europe

We have compiled some the best cafés around Europe: Places we like to go to because of their setting, their history or because they simply make great coffee. Have a look around and send us your favourite.

Fusion Market: an explosion of foreign flavours

The urban jungle of Lisbon offers a fusion space where the ancient and the modern mix with cuisine and culture from around the world.

Cooking with Grandma (Germany): Black Forest Spätzle

In this episode of “Cooking with Grandma”, Maria and her grandmother make a Southern German classic: Spätzle, a type of egg noodle.

Cooking the politically incorrect way

Meet the ‘the most politically incorrect’ chef in Portugal, Ljubomir Stanišić. Born in Sarajevo and raised in Belgrade, he is now showing the world what he has learned from his mother, including some of the most typical dishes from the former state of Yugoslavia.

Nothing has changed yet, but everything is different – The UK after the referendum

24 June, the day when the result of Britain’s referendum on exiting the EU was announced, happened now several weeks ago. The first feelings of surprise and disbelief that the UK, Europe and the world experienced on that day have subsided and the country is now different from what it was. What has changed and what will the future bring?

An ever growing family: Establishing the European Youth Parliament in Armenia

Young, motivated and ready to change the world: this is how the members of the European Youth Parliament of Armenia are best described. Hovsep Patvakanyan, head and founder of EYP Armenia, told us about his experiences establishing this extraordinary youth organization in Armenia, and the wonderful ideas which came to life thanks to the efforts of its members.

Meet your local heritage – a project that connects Bosnia’s youth

Twenty years after the war, which was the biggest in Europe after World War II, Bosnia and Herzegovina’s society is still deeply divided. During the last twenty years, hundreds of millions of dollars have been given to different NGO projects aiming to connect the members of the three constitutional nations, Bosniaks, Croats and Serbs, in order to raise the level of mutual tolerance and to build a society that will be based on real democratic principles.

Britain after Brexit: The dashed hopes of young Europhiles

The UK has voted to leave the EU, a close decision which has left many British people, especially the young, feeling frustrated and apprehensive. Our author attempts to describe the reaction of the 48% of the voters who wanted to remain, and how it feels now to be in a post-Brexit Britain.

A Song is a Weapon

Protest songs are common in every country. Mainly throughout the 60’s and 70’s, when rock and folk became charged with political and social statements about the world, sex, work, power, relations between people, discrimination. They call for change and denounce that which is wrong. Protest songs are especially important and courageous in countries where fighting oppression can cost you your life. And that was the case in Portugal during the 40 year period of the dictatorship that ended with the Carnation Revolution in 1974.

A New Beginning

In the Kolping educational training centre in Schwandorf, Germany, refugees and immigrants from all over the world share a classroom. Different cultures, everyday problems, and hopes for a better future shape the learning experience.

The au pair experience

You’re 18, 25 or even 30 years old. You’re eager to see the world, to have an international experience that will leave a mark on you before you carry on with your life. And the only condition is the price of the adventure. If you add to this your passion for children, it’s very likely you opt (if you haven’t already) for the same as Esther, Heather, Janika or Rode, and work as an au pair abroad.

Is there a culture clash between couples of mixed nationalities?

Multicultural couples are becoming increasingly more common in our global society. Travel, work and studies mean that new relationships have formed in which communication and respect for traditions of each member of the couple are key to a long-lasting relationship. However, these people are also usually victims of several problems such as an endless bureaucracy process and discrimination.

My language, my home, Catalan

In this first instalment of our new series of MH articles, “My language, my home”, we present the Catalan language. Each language is home to a unique culture, with a vision of the world slightly different to the rest. In this series, we get native speakers from different parts of Europe to explain what their language means to them and why it’s so important to keep it alive.

My Two Languages

She has always liked French. For this simple reason Eva decided to apply for a bilingual comprehensive school. This very reason brought her to university, where she is now studying French. Trivial as it may sound, just a few years ago Eva had no idea how much her life was going to change.

Europe and I – a love letter

Europe is going through a hard time, and it is only with faith, and a little bit of idealism too, that we can overcome this crisis. In a letter to her native continent our author recalls the best moments of a youth spent with eachother and holds out hope for the future. A love letter to Europe.

Polyamory – Three Views

Lately the concept of polyamory is all over the media. The basic concept: having more than one relationship. But what does that mean for those involved, how does it feel – and what makes people begin doing it?

Four visions over one reality: homosexuality in Russia

We spoke to Andrey Glushkó, who moved to Spain to live in ‘’freedom’’, his friend Anastasiya Belickaya, the young political scientist Nina Ivanova and the correspondent for El Mundo (daily Spanish newspaper) in Moscow to discover why 74 percent of Russians do not socially accept homosexuality.

Is there a culture clash between couples of mixed nationalities?

Multicultural couples are becoming increasingly more common in our global society. Travel, work and studies mean that new relationships have formed in which communication and respect for traditions of each member of the couple are key to a long-lasting relationship. However, these people are also usually victims of several problems such as an endless bureaucracy process and discrimination.

I like my men…

Maybe it’s his foreign accent when he speaks that melts your heart. Maybe it’s the way he holds you, or undresses you, or whispers in your ear, that makes you go crazy. Maybe it’s the way his skin color mixes with yours in such a perfect way, that nothing can compare with it. This is how I like my men. How do you like yours?

Nothing has changed yet, but everything is different – The UK after the referendum

24 June, the day when the result of Britain’s referendum on exiting the EU was announced, happened now several weeks ago. The first feelings of surprise and disbelief that the UK, Europe and the world experienced on that day have subsided and the country is now different from what it was. What has changed and what will the future bring?

Renting a flat in Dublin, the hurdle every foreign student has to face

Leaving your home and family to study in another country is extremely difficult, but finding a good place to live in Ireland is the biggest challenge, the white whale every student has to catch.

“The key to being a good photographer lies in the determination”

Photographer Gianfranco Tripodo has achieved one of the most prestigious awards in photojournalism, the World Press Photo, thanks to a snapshot that shows one of the harshest realities of the European Union: the situation of immigrants in the border city of Melilla.

A New Beginning

In the Kolping educational training centre in Schwandorf, Germany, refugees and immigrants from all over the world share a classroom. Different cultures, everyday problems, and hopes for a better future shape the learning experience.

“Translating in Russian is not the same as in Spanish”

“Translating in Russian is not the same as in Spanish/ Translating between...

In our Wallets

Everyone has a wallet and the bigger the wallet, the more we can put inside. Wallets are supposed to be for money but other random things can be found in there. It seems as though they are for everything. Recently our wallets have become a social issue. Everyone has started to count and recount their earnings, their costs and even pension contributions. Here are some wallets showing how they are used. What do you have in yours?

“You don’t just need a Leica, you also need a head and an eye.”

In 1914 Oskar Barnack, an employee at the optics enterprise Leitz in the German town of Wetzlar and a passionate amateur filmmaker, developed the first miniature camera that did not use glass plate exposure like other cameras at the time, but roll film. After its introduction to the market in 1924 it became a worldwide success and its compact size enabled a whole new kind of photography. Since 2014 the exhibition “Eyes Wide Open! – 100 Years of Leica Photography” has been taking a look at the culture that surrounds it and presenting the best pieces of the century in various European cities.

“The key to being a good photographer lies in the determination”

Photographer Gianfranco Tripodo has achieved one of the most prestigious awards in photojournalism, the World Press Photo, thanks to a snapshot that shows one of the harshest realities of the European Union: the situation of immigrants in the border city of Melilla.

My Ways

On the curvy roads of Armenia I feel sick and lost, waiting to get to the destination.

Battling the Post-Erasmus Blues: Hello my name is…

While it may not be a recognised medical condition, that glum feeling you get when you return to your home university is definitely normal, and something that every Ex-Erasmus student experiences. Right? In our new series, you can follow our author’s way back into ‘normal-life’ after an eventful year abroad.

Searching for the next destination

“It all started when I took a trip to see some relatives in Germany and then went to Bulgaria to see some friends. Since then the ‘instinct’ of the traveler awoke inside me. I usually choose places with cheap flights and go. Just like that. I arrive, find a hostel nearby, choose a room and then discover the place.”

Welcome to Ingrid Paradise!

Antoine and Julie, two 20 year old French college students, spent their “workers’ internship” in an Indian orphanage where they discovered girls striving to get an education for a better future. They tried to encourage and entertain them during the summer.

What are you going to study? v. What are you going to do?: A portrait of cultural difference

After having finished high school, going directly to college may seem like the logical and even only step to take in countries like Spain. However, in other countries like Germany, going on a gap year has become a hot topic. A cultural difference shown in two questions: What are you going to study? v. What are you going to do? And explained through the Erasmus experience of the author.

Europe and I – a love letter

Europe is going through a hard time, and it is only with faith, and a little bit of idealism too, that we can overcome this crisis. In a letter to her native continent our author recalls the best moments of a youth spent with eachother and holds out hope for the future. A love letter to Europe.

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